Category Archives: Apartment Living

How to Set Up Your First Apartment’s Wi-Fi

How to Set Up Your First Apartment’s Wi-Fi

When you’re moving into your first apartment, Wi-Fi will likely be one of the first things you want. However, setting up your internet involves several steps that can often be confusing, and dealing with internet service providers (ISPs) can be challenging. But fret not – below are simple answers to all your questions about how to set up your first apartment’s Wi-Fi.

When should you contact your ISP?

Before you move to your first apartment, call your new ISP. This way, your internet will be turned on as soon as possible – perhaps even before you’re moved in. 

You should also determine which ISPs are available in your new location. Sometimes, only one major ISP provides internet to your region, but in other cases, you’ll have several choices. Once you determine your ISP, search for sales or bundles to keep your costs low. How to Set Up Your First Apartment's Wi-Fi

What documentation do you need?

Before you call your new ISP, make sure you have all the documents your ISP requires in order to start an account. Although different companies will request different documents, it’s generally best to have at least two documents that prove your residency

These documents can be lease agreements, utility welcome letters and bills, bank statements, cell phone bills, and government-issued ID cards. After you show documentation and establish your plan, you can schedule an appointment for a technician to start your internet service.

How to set up your apartment’s Wi-Fi

Once you determine your ISP, start an account, and set an appointment, take the following steps to set up your apartment’s Wi-Fi:

  1. Get a router: Most ISPs will offer the option to rent a modem and router. While these devices often work well, their hardware can sometimes prove lacking. That’s why you may want to buy a more reliable router and modem. If you do so, you may save money in the long run, as you won’t have to pay monthly rental fees for an ISP’s router and modem.
  2. Connect all your cables: After your Internet service is turned on and you get a modem and router, you’ll need to connect your cables. First, the modem should connect to a cable outlet. The Ethernet cord will then connect your wireless router to the modem. Then, plug your modem and router into an electrical outlet to turn them both on. After a few minutes, the router and modem’s lights should turn on.
  3. Don’t forget about security: Prevent cyberattacks and data breaches by changing your internet network’s username and password. You should create a strong password containing randomized letters, numbers, and symbols.

How to access the internet as you wait for Wi-Fi

If you don’t yet have access to a Wi-Fi network in your apartment, there are a couple of ways to get Wi-Fi. If you have a smartphone, you can tether your data connection to your computer through your phone’s mobile hotspot settings. Your hotspot will then appear as a Wi-Fi network option on your computer or tablet. 

If you use your hotspot feature, monthly charges may vary. Some phone carriers may include hotspots as part of your monthly smartphone service, but others may charge costly fees. If you can’t afford hotspots, public Wi-Fi may sometimes be an option, but it’s rarely secure. Private, personal Wi-Fi is better – and that’s why following the above instructions for a hassle-free Wi-Fi setup matters so much.

Published at Tue, 02 Feb 2021 16:56:59 +0000

Moving Company Quotes & Tips to Plan Your Move | MYMOVE

Moving Company Quotes & Tips to Plan Your Move | MYMOVE

What is MYMOVE?

MYMOVE is your one-stop-shop for all things moving. We know that moving can be stressful, and we’re here to help lighten the load.
As an authorized affiliate of the USPS®, we connect more than 5 million people each year to name-brand deals and expert resources that make moving easier. We bring everything you need for your move together, so you don’t have to manage it on your own.
With MYMOVE, you can say goodbye to moving stress and hello to tools that help you tackle your move.

How can I use MYMOVE’s resources to check off my moving to-dos?

We’re here to help you take control of your move.
Learn everything you need to know about your new area with our city guides and cost of living calculator. Organize all of your to-dos with our customizable moving checklist. Compare moving companies on our site to find the best moving services. Declutter before you pack, and we’ll help you find charities in your area that do free donation pickup. File an online change-of-address with USPS®, and we’ll make sure your mail moves with you.
No matter the moving task, we help you tackle it.

Latest updates and news:

Are you planning a move during COVID-19? You’re not the only one. 15.9 million people moved during the first six months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a recent MYMOVE study. The study, which looked at USPS® mail forwarding requests from February to July, found that the total number of moves during coronavirus increased compared to the same period last year.

We also found that temporary moves increased by 27%, and people left large, densely populated cities like Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Chicago in unprecedented numbers. Read more about that study here.

If you have plans to move during the pandemic, take precautions to keep you and your family healthy. Follow our coronavirus safety guide to prevent the spread of the virus on Moving Day. If you’re a college student moving out of the dorms for winter break, here are some tips and resources to help lighten the load and keep you safe.

Winter months and the pandemic can add stress and anxiety if you’re experiencing housing instability. If you’re facing possible homelessness or are at risk of a lease ending during coronavirus, our guides connect you to resources and expert advice.

Published at

A Cozy New Rug Collection

A Cozy New Rug Collection

Hello friends! Praise be, the election is over and I just marked my birthday over the weekend – my official holiday season milestone. Whenever the calendar passes November 8, I feel like I can finally turn 100% of my attention to all things holiday. Obviously, the holidays are going to look and feel very different than years past. Perhaps instead of the holiday season, we should start referring to the next few months as the hunker down season. Because that’s what holidays in the time of Covid are going to require of us. But I’m not entirely mad about the idea of holing up at home. I’ll take a very valid excuse to look for ways to make my home as cozy, comforting, and beautiful as possible.

Enter the new rug collection from Beni Rugs, designed by my style soul twin, Colin King.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

Called the Shape of Color, this new rug collection offers eleven Moroccan style rugs. Each rug features shocks of color inspired by Tangier and Marrakech. The hues are deeply saturated in simple geometric shapes or big bold stripes.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

While I typically eschew color, rugs are a wonderful spot to inject something fresh into a room. I used a bold colored rug in my own living room. The particularly nice thing about a rug – it’s an easy way to reenergize a space without really having to change anything else.

A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34 A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34 A Cozy New Rug Collection on Apartment 34

There are a few secrets to picking out a rug. First, you want to think about size. A common mistake is getting a rug that is too small. You want all (or nearly all) your furniture in a space to sit on your rug. That helps a room feel anchored and like everything is working together. A too-small rug will actually make a small space feel even smaller!

Next, you want to think about foot traffic. If you’re looking to put a rug in a high foot traffic area, you’ll want to ensure any rug you select will withstand an onslaught of dirt and use.

Finally, when adding a colorful rug to your space you don’t need to “match your decor. You just want to keep everything in the same design family. Do you decorate with mostly warm colors or cooler tones? That will help you pick your colors.



 

If you’re looking to upgrade the coziness of your home before the holidays hit, I definitely think one of these rugs would be a great way to do it. I’m already debating which one I might add to our house. I do have a home office refresh in the works! If I pick out one of these rugs – I’ll be sure to share.

How are you planning on sprucing up your spaces for the holidays?

images c/o beni rugs

Published at Tue, 10 Nov 2020 20:10:40 +0000

Here are the Hottest and Coldest NYC Neighborhoods of 2020

Here are the Hottest and Coldest NYC Neighborhoods of 2020

As the pandemic continues to drastically change the New York City real estate landscape, we at RentHop wanted to explore how rent prices have been affected this past year. To do this, we analyzed rental price data from every neighborhood in the city and compared these prices to this same period last year. Our results shed light on the current dynamic of the market and uncovered the few neighborhoods that have surprisingly weathered the storm.

Summary of Findings

We compared 1-bedroom median net effective rent prices in each NYC neighborhood between Q3 2019 and Q3 2020.

  • Rent prices dropped an average of 6.25% across all neighborhoods we studied.
  • 86% of neighborhoods saw rent prices decrease over the year.
  • Only 11% of neighborhoods saw a rent increase; Inwood was the sole Manhattan neighborhood to see an appreciation.
  • Coney Island was the hottest neighborhood of the year, with prices increasing 7.78%.
  • Little Italy was the coldest, with prices decreasing 17.24%.
  • New York City renters have strong negotiating power, with many landlords doubling their concessions since last year.

Discussion

Overall, our report painted a bleak picture for real estate across New York City over the past year. As landlords scrambled to drop rents and offer concessions to keep tenants during the pandemic, prices fell across the vast majority of New York neighborhoods. In fact, out of the 85 neighborhoods we looked at, only 11% saw rents increase. Inwood was the lone Manhattan neighborhood to see an appreciation.

On average, across every neighborhood we studied, rents dropped a significant 6.25%. This was an even steeper decline when compared to the 5% average decrease that we reported on in July.

While rent drops were widespread across the city, pricier areas in Manhattan were hit the hardest. Places like the Fort Greene also saw a modest 3.7% rise. Coney Island saw the most growth with a 7.8% increase, though much of this was due to the opening of 1 Ocean Drive, a 22-story, 211-unit luxury oceanfront rental building. This building launched in December 2019, driving median neighborhood rents upward.

NYC Renter’s Market

The current climate strongly dictates a renter’s market. Our dataset shows that landlords across the city have been open to dropping gross rent prices, offering considerable concessions like free rent or reduced deposits, and in some cases even both. In particular, many luxury high rise buildings have increased their incentive schemes, doubling concessions since pre-COVID times.

Renters in New York should know that they have increased negotiation power at this time, and should always consider their options.

Neighborhoods With the Largest Rent Increases
  1. Coney Island, Brooklyn — +7.78%
  2. Kew Gardens Hills, Queens — +5.35%
  3. Fort Greene, Brooklyn — +3.67%
  4. Bensonhurst, Brooklyn — +3.13%
  5. Briarwood, Queens — +2.75%
Neighborhoods With the Largest Rent Drops
  1. Little Italy, Manhattan — -17.24%
  2. Upper West Side, Manhattan — -16.67%
  3. Chelsea, Manhattan — -16.18%
  4. Hell’s Kitchen, Manhattan — -16.16%
  5. Flatiron District, Manhattan — -15.79%

Methodology

This report analyzed the New York City rental market using millions of rental listings drawn from the RentHop database during the third quarter of both 2019 and 2020 (July 1 – September 30, 2019 and July 1 – September 30, 2020). Median one bedroom rent prices for each year were then compared to calculate the yearly percentage change in price.

Data was gathered for every neighborhood in NYC, excluding those with fewer than 50 rental listings over the respective quarter. It should be noted that given the low listing density in Staten Island, neighborhoods from this borough were excluded as they did not meet the minimum 50 listing sample size criteria. Sub-neighborhoods, such as Koreatown and Rose Hill, were combined into larger neighborhoods to ensure consistent comparisons and listing counts.

For more information on our methodology, or to contact our data team, please email press@renthop.com.

Full Dataset

 

Published at Tue, 13 Oct 2020 12:37:25 +0000

9 Luxury Sheet Sets That Are Totally Worth the Splurge

9 Luxury Sheet Sets That Are Totally Worth the Splurge

We independently select these products—if you buy from one of our links, we may earn a commission.

We spend roughly one-third of our lives in bed, so when it comes to self-care, splurging on a set of luxurious sheets is a must. Let’s face it: When it’s cold outside, is there anything better than feeling cozy under the covers while reading in bed? Or maybe you need to get a great night’s sleep to wake up rested and refreshed for that early AM Zoom meeting? Bottom line: It’s time to upgrade your bedding. High-quality sheets come in many styles and fabrics, which makes choosing the material just as fun as picking the color. If you like a warm bed, then flannel is a good choice, while sateen is ideal for sleepers who prefer silky, soft material. Or, if your focus is eco-friendliness, choose bamboo. No matter your style, check out these nine perfect options to gift yourself or a loved one.

Published at Mon, 02 Nov 2020 21:47:04 +0000

People are Moving 14% Less in Boston

People are Moving 14% Less in Boston

If you live in Boston, you are probably no stranger to moving truck permits. Aside from packing everything in boxes and contacting the movers, you also need to apply for a moving truck permit and post the “no-parking” sign so you don’t have to stack up everything on the corner of your street on the moving day.

Moving truck permits in some ways reflect the housing demand in the city of Boston. While the number of issued moving truck permits usually surges each year from August through the first couple of days of September in accordance with the college move-in days, generally speaking, the more moving truck permits issued, the more real estate activity there is.

As one of the major cities hit hard by COVID-19, Boston saw a huge decline in renter demand. In our report this year, we examined how the pandemic has affected the Boston housing market, specifically by looking at the number of moving truck permits issued.

The number of moving truck permits issued by the city is down 14.7% this year

Figure 1 below summarizes the number of issued moving truck permits with an expiration date between January and September, from 2015 to 2020. In total, 11,885 permits have been issued so far in 2020, 14.7% less than the same time period in 2019.

Knowing the totals is not good enough. By comparing the number of moving truck permits issued by month in the past six years, we could better understand the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. Figure 2 below breaks down the number of issued moving truck permits by month, covering the period from January 2015 all the way through September 2020.

The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the U.S. was reported on January 20, 2020, and on February 1, Boston announced its first confirmed case. As cases soared, the city entered the lockdown in mid-March. Moving came to a halt in April, with the total number of moving truck permits issued fell to 458, the lowest since January 2015 and 47.7% fewer than April 2019. The number continued to stay low through June, putting downward pressure on rents. In Boston, one-bedroom median rent was down in 2.6% year-over-year in June 2020, according to RentHop data.

While August topped all previous months in terms of the number of moving truck permits issued in recent years, mostly because of the college move-ins (for most colleges, the move-ins were twice as long), remember, many students moved into dorms, not rental properties, and the surge might not fully represent the demand in the Boston rental market. Once the move-in madness passed, the rental demand could fall again. Based on the data, it looks like September 2020 is on track to be the worst month of September compared to previous ones. The pandemic has driven down the rental demand across Boston – one-bedroom median rent currently sits at $2,350, 6.0% lower than last year.

West Roxbury, Seaport, and Fenway-Kenmore Experienced Drops in Permits Issued

While overall fewer moving truck permits have been issued so far in 2020, some areas saw more significant drops compared to others. The map below highlights Boston zip codes as well as the number of permits issued in 2020, the year-over-year change, and the difference from the yearly average (2015- 2019). The darker the shades, the fewer permits were issued compared to 2019.

 

Of the 40+ zip codes included in this map, zip code 02132 (West Roxbury) saw the largest drop in the number of issued moving truck permits (22 permits, YoY -53.2%), followed by zip code 02210 (Seaport), which saw a YoY of -46.7%. Table 1 below features the 10 zip codes with the most number of moving truck permits issued so far in 2020. Note how the numbers are all lower compared to the same period in 2019.

Rent Dropped in Some Zip Codes Amid Moving Downtrend

In addition to grouping and analyzing issued moving truck permits by their expiration dates, we also explored the relationship between rental prices and moving truck permits. To assess the correlation between year-over-year median rental price changes and differences from average yearly issued permits, we plotted the two against one another and calculated the correlation coefficient.

We noticed a slight positive correlation (R2 = 11%) between the year-over-year rent change and the difference from the yearly average of permits issued among zip codes, which states that as zip codes experiencing fewer moving activities compared to the yearly average from 2015 to 2019 saw bigger price drops.


Methodology

This report examines how COVID-19 has impacted the Boston rental market, specifically through the number of issued moving truck permits and rental rate changes. The moving truck permit data is made public by Analyze Boston. Median one-bedroom rents and year-over-year median rent growth by zip code were calculated using RentHop’s proprietary listing data. For the regression analysis, we included only zip codes with over 10 moving truck permits issued in 2020.

Our previous Boston Move-In Day studies can be found here:

Published at Wed, 16 Sep 2020 02:57:58 +0000

Home Tour: A Perfectly Autumnal Oasis in CT

Home Tour: A Perfectly Autumnal Oasis in CT

I know many espouse shopping vintage as the only way to inject “authentic personality” into your home. I wouldn’t say I disagree. I enjoy the vintage scavenger hunt as much as anyone, but sometimes you need more expedient options. And if those options look as good as these fall pieces from Anthropologie do, I’m totally ok with that.

I posted about Anthro’s latest collaboration last month and their hits just keep on coming. I’m the first to admit I’ve often thought of Anthro pieces as overly whimsical, feminine and a touch too cottage chic, but this new editorial shows that it all depends on your context. A beautiful home designed by famed architect Richard Neutra certainly helps. This one is for sale FYI!

But what this home tour really illustrates is that a piece can take on a totally different personality in a different environment – so really you shouldn’t rule an option out at first glance. Really think about how something will look and feel in your space regardless if it’s modern or bohemian-inspired.

I could not be more obsessed with this wood cabinet. It has a really unique a mesh overlay, a travertine top an gorgeous rounded corners.

Also I have to mention that this mix of wood tones is giving me all kinds of inspiration for our new cottage. And since I only have about 10 weeks to renovate and furnish the entire house, I’m fully ok with unearthing some gems – big box store or not.

This entire home is a beautiful study in mixing soothing neutrals, a variety of texture and a feeling of pieces being collected over time. But you didn’t have to wait years to stumble across the perfect treasure. And there’s no shame in that!

As we shift into the new season and really think about making our homes our sanctuary from both the colder temperatures and from Covid, you can think out of the box while still shopping within one.

I spy the gorgeous foraged branch work of Colin King.

photography by Nicole Franzen, styling by Colin King for Anthropologie.

Published at Tue, 06 Oct 2020 05:52:17 +0000

Rodent Crisis is Getting Worse in Major U.S. Cities

Rodent Crisis is Getting Worse in Major U.S. Cities

Have you ever come across rats carrying bits and pieces of leftover food? Or maybe you’ve seen them in your kitchen and gone completely wild trying to kill them? It is known that rats are rampant in the city and live among us, taking refuge and shelter on the streets, and even sometimes in our homes. What’s worse is that rodents are a major public health problem, and more and more resources are invested in rodent inspection and prevention.

Each year, we at RentHop examine the data from major U.S. cities, hoping to help renters and homeowners make an informed decision when it comes to housing. This year, we again reviewed the rat sightings data, and what we discovered isn’t great. Our study this year includes Boston, Chicago, and Washington D.C., and unfortunately, all three cities saw a drastic increase in the number of rodent complaints.

Figure 1 below illustrates the number of rodent complaints from January through August in the past five years. In Boston, the number went up 33.5% to 3.42 rodent complaints/1,000 population. In D.C., the number is slightly worse. As of August 31, 2020, DC 311 has received 5,848 rodent complaints, or 8.29 complaints/1,000 population. This number is 30.7% higher than in 2019.

Chicago, a.k.a. the rat capital, not surprisingly, has had the greatest number of rat sightings/1,000 population among the cities included. The number reached its lowest in 2018 but has since been rising significantly. From January 2019 through August 2019, the city’s 311 reporting system received 28,249 rodent complaints or 10.5/1,000 population. This number since jumped to 34,501, or 12.8/1,000 population in 2020, a 22.1% increase.

Select one of the cities below to learn more:


Rodent complaints rose 33.5% in Boston

Founded in 1630 by the Puritans, Boston is one of the oldest cities in the United States and played a crucial part in our history. As we all know, old infrastructure often makes perfect habitats for rats. Rodents thrive in outdated subway systems, sewers, parks, and in foundations of old homes and buildings, and pose a threat to humans.

And this summer, Boston has to deal with a serious rodent crisis.

As of August 31, Boston 311 has received 2,368 rodent complaints in 2020, which translates to 3.4 complaints per 1,000 population. Now, while it might seem very few compared to Chicago or DC, this number, however, is 33.5% higher than the same period in 2019.

The CDC attributed such an increase to the coronavirus lockdown. The agency warned that a possible increase in rodent sightings as restaurants and other sources of food shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. It is worth noting, however, that the number had been increasing since January 2020, way before the first confirmed COVID-19 case and lockdown were announced in Boston. The rats were particularly active this past summer. August 2020 marked the worst month in the past five years, with a total of 530 rodent complaints filed to the city’s 311 reporting system. Could it be the warm weather? After all, winter 2019-2020 ended over 2°F above the twentieth-century average, making it one of the warmest winters on record.

Which neighborhoods are run by rats this year?

According to the city’s Inspectional Services Department, it is launching a campaign to reduce the rodent population that has been running wild around neighborhoods. Do you know if your neighborhood will be one of the firsts visited by the agency? Well, let’s find out!

The interactive map below indicates the concentration of rodent complaints in Boston. Neighborhoods in darker shades have a higher concentration of rodent complaints in 2020. It is highly possible that larger neighborhoods receive more complaints than smaller neighborhoods, and so we normalized the number of rodent complaints by land size. You can click on the polygons to learn more about each neighborhood.

The ISD will most likely show up in these neighborhoods
  • Downtown – 312 complaints in 2020, 502.3 complaints/sq mi
  • North End – 55 complaints in 2020, 277.4 complaints /sq mi
  • South End – 153 complaints in 2020, 207.6 complaints /sq mi
  • Beacon Hill – 56 complaints in 2020, 179 complaints /sq mi
  • Back Bay – 107 complaints in 2020, 171.5 complaints /sq mi
Rodent complaints spiked in these neighborhoods
  • South Boston Waterfront – 1 complaints in 2019, 7 in 2020 (+600%)
  • Allston – 75 complaints in 2019, 189 in 2020 (+152%)
  • Brighton – 99 complaints in 2019, 213 in 2020 (+115.2%)
  • Back Bay – 55 complaints in 2019, 107 in 2020 (+94.5%)
  • Mattapan – 23 complaints in 2019, 41 in 2020 (+78.3%)
Rodent complaints dropped in these neighborhoods
  • Longwood – 2 complaints in 2019, 0 in 2020
  • Chinatown – 29 complaints in 2019, 10 in 2020 (-65.5%)
  • Leather District – 8 complaints in 2019, 4 in 2020 (-50%)
  • Mission Hill – 40 complaints in 2019, 20 in 2020 (-50%)
  • West End – 3 complaints in 2019, 2 in 2020 (-33.3%)

Chicago wins the title of “Rat Capital”, yet again.

In our study from last year, Chicago ranked #1 as the “rat capital” in the country. The abundance of garbage and buildings in the Windy City makes it a great location for rats to seek shelter and food for survival. In 2019, Chicago 311 received in total 42,864 rodent complaints, or 15.9 per 1,000 Chicagoans, 10.2% more than in 2018.

And this year, rodents are once again on the rise.

As of August 2020, the Windy City has scored 34,501 rat sighting reports, 22.1% more than the same period in 2019. Indeed, the uptick in rodent sightings might be related to restaurants and other sources of food shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. It is worth noting, however, that the number had been increasing since January 2020, way before the food establishments were forced to close their doors.

May 2020 marked the worst month of May in the past five years, with a total of 5,203 rat sightings reported to the city’s 311 system, 131.7% higher than May 2019. The number continued trending upward throughout the summer, with 6,863 rodent complaints logged in July 2020 – that’s over 200 complaints per day!

Which neighborhoods are run by rats this year?

The interactive map below indicates the concentration of rodent complaints in Chicago. Neighborhoods in darker shades have a higher concentration of rodent complaints. It is possible that larger neighborhoods receive more complaints than smaller neighborhoods, and so we normalized the number of rodent complaints by land size. You can click on the polygons to learn more about each neighborhood.

Rats are roaming around in these neighborhoods
  • Grand Boulevard – 257 complaints in 2020, 147.8 complaints/sq mi
  • Printers Row – 5 complaints in 2020, 64.5 complaints/sq mi
  • United Center – 124 complaints in 2020, 106.3 complaints/sq mi
  • Sheffield & DePaul – 99 complaints in 2020, 263.3 complaints/sq mi
  • Humboldt Park – 1039 complaints in 2020, 231.7 complaints/sq mi
Rat sightings spiked in these neighborhoods
  • Greektown – 1 complaints in 2019, 12 in 2020 (1100%)
  • West Pullman – 191 complaints in 2019, 793 in 2020 (315.2%)
  • Gold Coast – 15 complaints in 2019, 47 in 2020 (213.3%)
  • Hegewisch – 10 complaints in 2019, 31 in 2020 (210%)
  • O’Hare – 2 complaints in 2019, 6 in 2020 (200%)
Rats are migrating out from these neighborhoods
  • Jackson Park – 2 complaints in 2019, 0 in 2020
  • Grant Park – 6 complaints in 2019, 1 in 2020 (-83.3%)
  • Printers Row – 17 complaints in 2019, 5 in 2020 (-70.6%)
  • Burnside – 30 complaints in 2019, 14 in 2020 (-53.3%)
  • Millennium Park – 2 complaints in 2019, 1 in 2020 (-50%)

Rodent complaints are up 31% this year in Washington D.C.

Washington D.C. is known for many things. It is the capital of the United States of America; it is a cultural center with many monuments and museums, such as the Smithsonian Institution; and it is a walkable and bike-friendly city with many bike lanes in the downtown area. What you probably don’t know about D.C. is that not only our president and government officials reside there, many, many rats also call it home, and this year, the District has seen a spike in rat complaints.

The number of rodent complaints has been trending upward in D.C. since 2016, but 2020 is by far the worst year. By the end of August 2020, D.C.’s 311 reporting system has received a total of 5,848 rodent complaints, 30.7% more than the same period in 2019.

The past summer was particularly bad for D.C. June 2020 marked the worst month since January 2016, with a total of 985 unique complaints made to D.C. 311 by Washingtonians. 37.2% more than June 2019. Could it be that people are more likely to spot rats when they are working from home? Or maybe as the restaurants closed due to COVID-19, these furry critters are forced to invade people’s homes? No one knows for sure. But what we do know is that some neighborhoods are seeing more rodents than others, and that’s bad news for the residents. Now, check out the map and see if your neighborhood is one of them.

Which neighborhoods are run by rats this year?

The interactive map below indicates the concentration of rodent complaints Washington D.C. Neighborhoods in darker shades have a higher concentration of rat sightings. It is possible that larger neighborhoods receive more complaints than smaller neighborhoods, and so we normalized the number of rodent complaints by land size. You can click on the polygons to learn more about each neighborhood.

These neighborhoods are run by rats this year
  • Columbia Heights, Mt. Pleasant, Pleasant Plains, Park View – 691 complaints in 2020, 526.3 complaints/sq mi
  • Shaw, Logan Circle – 213 complaints in 2020, 376.8 complaints/sq mi
  • Brightwood Park, Crestwood, Petworth – 847 complaints in 2020, 337.6 complaints/sq mi
  • Howard University, Le Droit Park, Cardozo/Shaw – 214 complaints in 2020, 297.9 complaints/sq mi
  • Union Station, Stanton Park, Kingman Park – 461 complaints in 2020, 287.7 complaints/sq mi
Rodent complaints surged in these neighborhoods
  • National Mall, Potomac River – 6 complaints in 2019, 35 in 2020 (+483.3%)
  • Woodland/Fort Stanton, Garfield Heights, Knox Hill – 3 complaints in 2019, 10 in 2020 (+233.3%)
  • Fairfax Village, Naylor Gardens, Hillcrest, Summit Park – 3 complaints in 2019, 9 in 2020 (+200%)
  • Cleveland Park, Woodley Park, Massachusetts Avenue Heights, Woodland-Normanstone Terrace – 22 complaints in 2019, 62 in 2020 (+181.8%)
  • Colonial Village, Shepherd Park, North Portal Estates – 4 complaints in 2019, 9 in 2020 (+125%)
Rodent complaints dropped in these neighborhoods
  • North Cleveland Park, Forest Hills, Van Ness – 4 complaints in 2019, 1 in 2020 (-75%)
  • Eastland Gardens, Kenilworth – 3 complaints in 2019, 1 in 2020 (-66.7%)
  • Saint Elizabeths – 10 complaints in 2019, 4 in 2020 (-60%)
  • Downtown, Chinatown, Penn Quarters, Mount Vernon Square, North Capitol Street – 89 complaints in 2019, 50 in 2020 (-43.8%)
  • Douglas, Shipley Terrace – 27 complaints in 2019, 16 in 2020 (-40.7%)

Methodology

This study examines the rodent crisis in major U.S. cities, including Boston, Chicago, and Washington D.C. The rodent complaint data was retrieved from each city’s open data portal, and the population data was collected via U.S. Census Bureau. For this study, we limited the research time frame to January 2016 through August 31, 2020. We then geocoded the complaints using each city’s neighborhood shape file and normalized the complaint count by land size. This allows us to fairly rank each neighborhood and provide better insights.

RentHop is all about data and facts. Our data science team does annual studies on rental data as well as 311 complaints across major U.S. cities. To get to know the city you live in, take a look at our previous studies on rodent complaints, human/animal waste complaints, noise complaints, and more.

Published at Wed, 23 Sep 2020 03:41:24 +0000

As NYC Exodus Continues, Sublets Rose 158% Year-Over-Year

As NYC Exodus Continues, Sublets Rose 158% Year-Over-Year

Summer months are historically great for real estate. This summer, however, has been a rough one, especially for landlords across New York City. The market has been grappling with high vacancies as New Yorkers flee to suburbs and other metro areas and companies extend their remote-working policies, which further hinders population inflow.

Citywide, median net effective rent in the month of August fell 5.2% year-over-year. Manhattan, specifically, saw a rent drop of 7.5%, from $3,284 in August 2019, to $3,039, as landlords offer more concessions in response to the high vacancies. Meanwhile, the median net effective rent fell 1.9% year-over-year to $2,795 in Brooklyn.

NYC Exodus Continues

As previously reported, this year we’ve noticed an unprecedented number of renters looking to sublet their apartments. The total number of sublet listings1 on RentHop went up 110% from April to May 2020 and has since been trending upward. In August, the total number of sublet listings increased by 9.8% month-over-month and is 158.2% higher than August 2019. This once again broke the record in RentHop’s 11-year history.

In our previous sublet reports, we highlighted that wealthy neighborhoods, particularly those in Manhattan, saw a steeper upward deviation from their 2020 average than other neighborhoods. This time around, the outflow from wealthy neighborhoods in Manhattan, such as Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen, seems to have reached its peak in July and has since died down slightly. The neighborhoods that saw the largest spike in new sublets in August 2020 vs. the first four months of the year were Yorkville (+643%), East Harlem (+464%), Astoria (+420%), Central Harlem (+327%), and Bedford-Stuyvesant (+300%). Most of these neighborhoods also saw a month-over-month increase in the number of new sublets from July to August 2020.

Brooklyn Replaced Manhattan as the Most Popular Borough

Grand Central was once the busiest hub in New York City. It’s now one of those eerily empty stops that make people wonder if New York City will ever be the same. According to CBRE via WSJ, only 9% of the office workers returned to their office after they were permitted to return to the workplace. This inversely drove rental demand in outer boroughs, as living in the city center and being close to work no longer justifies the rent premium many landlords ask for.

Bushwick was the most inquired neighborhood in August 2020, replacing Hell’s Kitchen. Meanwhile, Crown Heights rose to the second from the 8th in the previous year. Yorkville and Upper East Side, both used to be the most popular neighborhoods for rentals, had experienced significant changes in terms of renter inquiries.


1. As used in this study, “sublet listings” are listings created by apartment renters seeking to find a new tenant to take over the remainder of their apartment lease. In NYC, finding a subletter is widely considered the most effective way to get out from under a lease without paying the steep contractual penalties triggered by an outright lease break.

Published at Wed, 09 Sep 2020 12:50:11 +0000